MEMORANDUM

FROM: John Sybalsky

DATE: September 15, 1991

RE: Release 2.0 of Medley for the Sun Workstation


Enclosed is the software and documentation for Release 2.0 of Medley for the Sun Workstation. The package consists of the following:


image


image

Release 2.0 March, 1991


image


image

Release 2.0

June, 1991


image


Address comments to:

Venue

User Documentation 1549 Industrial Road

San Carlos, CA 94070 415-508-9672

image

MEDLEY FOR THE SUN WORKSTATION USER’S GUIDE

Release 2.0

J une, 1991

Copyright 1990, 1991 by Venue. All rights reserved.

Envos is a trademark of Envos Corporation. Medley is a trademark of Venue.

Xerox is a registered trademark and InterPress is a trademark of Xerox Corporation.

UNIX is a registered trademark of UNIX System Laboratories. Post Script is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Inc.

The following are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc.:

Sun, Sun–2, Sun–3, Sun–4, SunOS, and SPARCstation are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc.

Sun and Sun Workstation are registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc.


The X Window System is a trademark of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

IBM is a trademark of International Business Machines, Inc.

MIPS is a registered trademark of MIPS Computer Systems, Inc.

Copyright protection includes material generated from the

software programs displayed on the screen, such as icons, screen display looks, and the like.


image

The information in this document is subject to change without notice and should not be construed as a commitment by Venue. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this document, Venue assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear.


Text was written and produced with Venue text formatting tools; Xerox printers were used to produce text masters. The typeface is Classic.

image

TABLE of CONTENTS

Preface ix

  1. Introduction 1

    What Medley Requires 1

    Hardware 1

    Input/Output Devices 1

    Bitmap Display 1

    Printers 1

    Software Requirements 2

    Medley and Other Applications 2

    Display Usage 2

    Processor Usage ................................................................................................................ 2

    System Components 2

    Medley Device-Naming Conventions 3

    Notation Conventions 3

    Fonts 3

    Packages 3

    Prompts 3

    Compatibility 4

    Sysout Compatibility 4

    Compiled-File Compatibility 4

    End-of-Line Convention 4

    Release Contents 4

    Documentation.................................................................................................................. 4

    Software 5

    LispUsers Modules 5

  2. Soft w are Installation 7

    Getting Ready to Install Medley 7

    Ensuring Adequate Swap Space 8

    Installing Medley for Shared Use 8

    Installing Medley Software 9

    Using the Installation Script’s Menu 9

    Getting a Copy Protection Key 11

    Changing Configurations or Adding Options 11

  3. Getting Started 13

    Getting Ready 13

    Running Medley 13

    Running Medley Directly 13

    Using the Medley Shell Script 13

    Where Medley Looks for Your Sysout 15

    Where Medley Looks for Your Site Initialization File 15

    Medley and X Windows 16

    Starting X Windows 16

    Running Medley Remotely 16

    The Medley Window 17

    Environment Variables 17

    Keyboard Interpretation 17

    Sun Type 3 Keyboard 18

    Sun Type 4 Keyboard 19

  4. Using Medley on the Sun Workstation 21

    Setting Up a Site Init File 21

    Setting Up a Personal Init File 22

    Saving Your State 22

    Sun-Specific Environment Functions 24

    System Environment Functions and Variables 24

    VM Functions.................................................................................................................. 2 5

    Stopping Lisp Temporarily 25

    Login Functions 26

    Environment Inquiry 26

    Display and Keyboard Functions and Variables 27

    Timers and Clocks 27

    Miscellaneous Operational Differences 28

    Console Messages 28

    image

  5. Medley File Systems 31

    File Naming Conventions ....................................................................................................... 3 1

    Hosts that Medley Supports 31

    Using SunOS Files from Medley 31

    Common {DSK} and {UNIX} Naming Conventions 32

    {DSK} Naming Conventions 33

    Version Numbering 33

    Pathnames 35

    {UNIX} Naming Conventions 35

    Directories 36

    Directory Enumeration 36

    Directory Creation 36

    Directory Deletion 37

    Open File Limit 37

    Default Pathname 37

    File Attributes 38

    File Variables 39

    File System Errors 39

  6. Error Recovery 41

URAID 41

Entering URAID 41

Conventions 41

URAID Commands 42

Displaying a Stack 42

Viewing Frames from a Stack 43

Miscellaneous 44

Other Fatal Error Conditions 44

Lisp Errors 44

Errors While Running Medley 44

Xerox Workstation-Specific Errors 45

Virtual Memory Errors 45


Appendix A. Installation Hints A-1

Medley Shell Variables ......................................................................................................... A-1

Running on Multiple Workstations ......................................................................................A-1

Installation for Sites with Sun-3 and Sun-4 Workstations ........................................A-1 Using a "runlde" on Multiple Workstations ................................................................A-2

Configuring the Software......................................................................................................A -2

Relinking ...................................................................................................................... .A-3

Enabling PUP/XNS Ethernet.......................................................................................A-3

Using NIS to Manage the Keys for Multiple Workstations ................................................A-3


Appendix B. Verifying the Installation Tape’s Validity B-1

Output ......................................................................................................................... ........... B-1

Examples ....................................................................................................................... ........ B-1


Appendix C. Layout of Installation Tape Files C-1

Layout of Installation Tape .................................................................................................. C- 1

Font Directories............................................................................................................... ...... C-3

Manually Extracting Files from the Installation Tape ....................................................... C-4


Appendix D. Differences bet w een Xerox Workstations and

the UNIX Version of Medley D-1

Local Disk and Floppy Functions ......................................................................................... D-1

Library Modules Not Supported on the Sun........................................................................ D-1

TCP, TCPCHAT, etc. .................................................................................................... D-1

DLRS232C, DLTTY ...................................................................................................... D-2

KEYBOARD, VIRTUALKEYBOARD.......................................................................... D-2

Glossary ............................................................................................................................... .... GLOSSARY-1

Index ............................................................................................................................... ..................... INDEX-1

image


[This page intentionally left blank]

LIST of FIGURES LIST of TABLES

image


Figure Page

2-1 Sample Installation Options Menu 10

    1. Sun Type 3 Key Numbering 18

    2. Sun Type 3 Left Key Pad 18

    3. Sun Type 3 Right Key Pad 18

    4. Sun Type 3 Center Key Pad Interpretation 19

    5. Sun Type 4 Key Numbering 19

    6. Sun Type 4 Left Key Pad 20

    7. Sun Type 4 Right Key Pad 20

    8. Sun Type 4 Center Key Pad Interpretation 20


Table Page

C-1 Font Directories ............................................................................................................ .......................... C-3

LIST OF FIGURES/TABLES


[This page intentionally left blank]

PREFACE

image


This Guide describes Medley release 2.0 for the Sun–3 and Sun–4 workstations and the SPARCstation: the release contents, instructions for installing the release, and

information on using it.


Audience

The Medley For the Sun Workstation User’s Guide is intended for users familiar with the Medley environment who want to use it on the Sun–3 or Sun–4 workstations or the SPARCstation. The Guide assumes that the user is already familiar with UNIX and

SunOS concepts. The system administrator of a Sun system or network should read this

Guide to ensure the correct installation of the Medley software.

Chapter 1 of this manual gives an overview of the product and its internal architecture, and is of interest to all users of the system.

System administrators should read Chapter 2, Software Installation; and Chapter 3,

Getting Started. These chapters guide the administrator through the process of

installing Medley 2.0 and configuring it on the Sun Workstation. Experienced Lisp users may want to configure the software; this procedure is described in Chapter 4.

Users already familiar with the Lisp environment on Xerox workstations should find Chapter 1 and Chapters 3 through 6 useful. These chapters describe the operation of the system after it has been installed as well as those functions and operations which are specific to the Sun Workstation.


Using This Manual

Chapter 1, Introduction , describes the hardware, input/output devices, and software needed to run Medley on a Sun Workstation; describes Medley and how it works with

other applications; lists the system components; introduces pertinent SunOS and UNIX conventions used throughout the Guide; explains Medley’s compatibility; and lists the contents of the release.

Chapter 2, Soft w are Installation , contains the installation and software configuration procedures.

Chapter 3, Getting Started , explains how to set up a site initialization file and install the X Windows System. It also shows the keyboard configuration and has instructions for getting started in Lisp on the Sun Workstation.

Chapter 4, Using Medley on the Sun Workstation , describes how specific Lisp functionality works on the Sun.

Chapter 5, Medley File Systems , discusses the file conventions that need to be followed when running in Medley on a Sun Workstation. Differences in Lisp file attributes and variables are also discussed.

Chapter 6, Error Recovery , describes the diagnostic error recovery program URAID.

This chapter explains how to recover from fatal error conditions and lists specific Lisp errors that may be encountered when running Medley on the Sun.

Appendix A, Installation Hints , contains additional notes to help configure Medley, and includes a complete description of the installation script.


Appendix B, Verifying the Installation Tape’s Validity , tells how to validate the contents of the tar tape.

Appendix C, Layout of Installation Tape Files , includes a listing of the tar tape directories and the font directories.

Appendix D, Differences bet w een Xerox Workstations and the UNIX Version of Medley , includes functions for controlling device-specific behavior of the Xerox 1100

series workstation disk drives. It also describes the library modules not supported on the Sun.

The Glossary provides definitions of SunOS, UNIX, and Lisp terms used in this Guide.


Medley is a Venue product which was built on the Xerox Lisp environment. It provides an integrated programming environment consisting of Interlisp-D and Common Lisp, a windowing system, and a set of programs and utilities. Users not already familiar with the Xerox Lisp environment should try to become somewhat familiar with it before

attempting serious development work.


Supporting Documentation


The following reference documents are useful to have on hand during the installation process and when working in Medley on the Sun Workstation.


Sun References

This literature from the Sun documentation set is useful during the installation and when running Medley on a Sun Workstation.


Venue Documentation

In addition to this Guide, the following documents describe the Medley system:

The manual LispUsers’ Modules, Medley Release, which may be purchased separately, supplements the Medley release.



[This page intentionally left blank]

  1. INTRODUCTION

    image


    Medley is an integrated programming environment, with support for the Interlisp and Common Lisp languages, an integrated windowing system, and a large collection of

    utilities and programs. It offers a mature and rich programming and development

    environment, as well as access to a large number of applications written for Interlisp, Interlisp-D, Common Lisp, and LOOPS.

    Medley for the Sun Workstation has two versions, a Sun–3 version and a Sun–4 version, available on separate tapes. Medley 2.0 runs on the Sun–3 and Sun–4 workstations and the SPARCstation.


    What Medley Requires


    Hardware

    Medley runs on Sun–3 and Sun–4 Workstations and the SPARCstation. It runs on both standalone workstations and diskless workstations linked to servers.

    Medley on the Sun–3 Workstation requires the MC68881 floating-point coprocessor chip. On the Sun–4 Workstation, the Weitek 1164/1165 coprocessor is optional, but recommended.

    For adequate performance, we recommend at least a 20 MHz 68020 (Sun 3/60 or 3/260), a 14 MHz SPARC (Sun 4/110 or 4/260), or a SPARCstation.

    Except under X Windows, reasonable interactive performance can be expected with 8

    megabytes (MB) or more of RAM. Smaller configurations of diskless workstations have been tested, but performance suffer s. When using X Windows software, allow an

    additional 4 MB.

    Naturally, larger applications will benefit from more memory. Medley’s maximum working set is approximately 40 MB.


    Input/Output Devices

    Medley provides access to the Sun’s input/output devices, such as display, keyboard, mouse, and file systems. It also provides access to PUP and XNS Ethernet services directly.


    Bitmap Display

    Medley supports all standard Sun displays and frame buffer s.


    Printers

    You can print on Xerox Interpress printers using the XNS networking protocols. The FX80 printer also works via the RS232 port.

    If you have a Post Script printer, you can use the LispUser modules Post Script Stream and UNIXPrint to direct output to your printer.


    Software Requirements

    Medley on the Sun–3 Workstation requires SunOS versions 3.2, 3.4, 3.5, 4.0, or 4.0.3. On the Sun–4 Workstation, Medley requires SunOS version 4.0, 4.0.3, or 4.1.

    If you plan to run Medley under X Windows, you will need X11, version 4 , or Motif.

    NOTE: Medley’s XNS Ethernet code will not work if you are running SunOS 3.5 configured for Kernel XNS Ethernet Support or Alpine.


    Medley and Other Applications

    image


    Display Usage

    When Medley is running alone, it takes over the entire display screen. When running under X, Medley uses one window as its screen; Medley maintains its own windows within that single window. Medley cannot run at the same time as Suntools or Open Windows.


    Processor Usage

    Medley runs its own process scheduler; as far as the UNIX scheduler is concerned,

    Medley is always running. For this reason, other heavy computational jobs on the same Sun Workstation will not get as good performance as they would competing with

    conventional UNIX interactive applications.

    Similarly, Medley may not have adequate interactive performance if it is competing with other compute-bound tasks on the same machine.

    For these reasons, we recommend that Medley be used on machines that are set up primarily for a single user.


    System Components

    Functionally, Medley consists of the following components:

    emulator A SunOS-executable program, which perform s several functions. It executes the Interlisp-D virtual machine instruction set compatibly with the microcode of the Xerox 1100 series workstations. (This

    instruction set allows memory-efficient representation of Interlisp and Common Lisp programs.) It also provides access to the host machine’s I/O (display, keyboard, file system), and executes some system

    functions directly.

    sysout A virtual memory image (the sysout ) containing both byte-code-

    compiled Lisp functions and data structures. The sysout provided can be used both on the Sun Workstation and on the Xerox 1100 series

    machines.

    library Files of compiled Lisp code and data structures.

    font s Data describing the "looks" of printed characters used by Medley’s

    graphics, windowing, and hardcopying subsystems. Font directories are in three groups: display font s, InterPress printer font s, and Press printer font s.

    image



    checksum A script that reports inconsistent files, the correct checksum values for the files, and an error message. The checksum of individual files can

    be generated with the UNIX command sum filename. Use this when Medley installs correctly but does not run.


    Medley Device-Naming Conventions

    Medley for the Sun Workstation lets you interact with SunOS file systems (including

    file systems mounted from other machines) by using host device names. The two device names are as follows:

    {DSK} A host name which gives you access to the SunOS file system using Xerox workstation local disk conventions.

    {UNIX} A host name which gives you access to the file system using normal SunOS conventions.

    The {DSK} device name provides an interface to the Sun Workstation for users who want to maintain compatibility with existing development tools and applications

    originally developed on a Xerox workstation. The {UNIX} device name provides a way for new applications to interact naturally with UNIX. Chapter 5 explains, in greater

    detail, some important exceptions and restrictions to the {DSK} and {UNIX} device name.


    Notation Conventions

    Text marked by a revision bar in the right margin contains information that was added or modified since the last release. Fonts, packages, and prompts have the following

    types of notation.


    Fonts

    Bold text in TITAN font indicates text you should type in exactly as printed.

    Regular TITAN font text indicates what the system prints on your workstation screen. Lisp functions and variables and UNIX files and programs are also shown in TITAN FONT.

    Text in Classic italics indicates variables or parameters that you should replace with the appropriate word or string.


    Packages

    Most Lisp symbols have a Lisp package qualifier; the INTERLISP package (IL:) is the default when no package qualifier is shown.


    Prompts

    All examples which include SunOS dialogues use the following conventions for the SunOS prompt.

    A number sign (#), part of the system prompt, indicates that you are logged on as root

    or is running su; for example,


    prompt#

    A percent sign (%), part of the system prompt, indicates that a user other than root is logged on; for example,

    prompt%


    Compatibility

    image

    The Medley release on the Sun Workstation is designed for maximum compatibility

    with the Xerox workstation implementations. However, when moving applications to the Sun Workstation note the differences in end-of-line conventions and techniques for moving files.


    Sysout Compatibility

    Sysouts of the same version are compatible with all machine types. But a sysout generated on a Sun Workstation cannot be used on a Xerox workstation.

    NOTE: You cannot mix different versions of sysouts and emulators.


    Compiled-File Compatibility

    Code compiled in a Medley 1.0, 1.1, 1.15 or 1.2 sysout cannot be loaded into Medley 2.0 sysouts, nor can code compiled in Medley 2.0 be loaded onto earlier sysouts. Code

    compiled for Medley 2.0 on a Xerox workstation cannot be loaded into Medley running on a Sun. The opposite is not possible either.


    End-of-Line Convention

    Some care must be taken in moving files to and from Xerox workstations, since the default end-of-line convention in UNIX is to terminate lines with the line feed (LF) character, while, traditionally, Medley has terminated lines with the carriage return (CR) character. In particular, if you use some other file transfer mechanism, such as

    FTP or Kermit, be careful to transfer .TEDIT, .DFASL, and .LCOM files in binary mode.

    In Medley on the Sun Workstation, the default end-of-line convention for all text files is line feed (LF). The default end-of-line convention for all binary files is carriage return (CR); this is because CR (ASCII 13) is used internally in the system.


    Release Contents

    image

    The release distribution contains the following documentation and software.


    Documentation

    The Medley documentation kit for users moving from a Xerox workstation to a Sun Workstation contains:

    image



    New customers also receive the following:


    Software

    The software release is available on either a 14-inch tape cartridge or a 12-inch 9-track tape. The software release is specific to the Sun architecture (Sun 3 or 4) for which you purchased Medley, but contains multiple SunOS versions. This tar tape contains the directories listed below. (See Appendix C for details of the directory contents.)

    ./install-medley

    ./medley

    ./install.sunos3/

    ./install.sunos4/

    ./install.sunos4.1/

    ./lisplibrary

    ./checksumdir

    ./lispsysouts

    ./fonts/display

    ./fonts/interpress


    LispUsers Modules

    The Medley version of LispUsers Modules is a software supplement to Medley for the Sun Workstation. This is software written by our users which you may purchase

    separately. The support for these modules comes from each module’s author; Venue has no commitment to support LispUsers’ modules.

    Two LispUsers Modules are particularly useful when you are running Medley on a Sun Workstation. For those users with Postscriptstream printers for output, the Post Script module is particularly useful. The LispUsers module RPC implements Sun remote

    procedure calls.



    [This page intentionally left blank]

  2. SOFTWARE INSTALLATION

    image


    This chapter describes how to install Medley on Sun Workstations.

    To install the Medley Release on a Sun Workstation, you need the following:

If you are upgrading, you only need to install the sysout, the appropriate emulator, and library files. If you are making a new installation, you will need at least the display font s as well.


Ensuring Adequate Swap Space

Medley requires 45 MB of swap space on top of the normal swap space requirements. Check swap space using the pstat command:

prompt% /etc/pstat -s

37176k used (3176k text), 12920k free, 1344k wasted, 0k missing max process allocable = 10224k

avail: 5*2048k 1*512k 4*256k 3*128k 6*64k 7*32k 7*16k 40*1k 4800k allocated + 2520k reserved = 7320k used, 64672k available

If you need more swap space, consult the Sun Software Technical Bulletin, March 1988,

pages 335-36, for information on increasing the amount of available swap space.


Installing Medley for Shared Use

If several people will be be using Medley on different machines, it probably makes sense to install one copy and have people share it.

You will need to find one machine—probably your main file server—with enough disk space. You will also want to have the directory look the same to every user. We

recommend calling the installation directory /usr/share/lde.

image


Installing Medley Software

  1. Log in under your username.

    login yourname

  2. Put the tape in the tape drive. The script will allow you to install from a tape drive on a remote host. If you are performing a remote installation, put the tape in the

    tape drive of the host.

  3. Retrieve the installation utility from the tape, as follows.

  4. Run the installation utility:

install-medley

Each time you are prompted for information, the script will show you the default in [

] brackets. Pressing the return key selects the default. To select a different option, type it.

After installing Medley, the script will offer to update two files which must refer to the installation directory. We recommend this. The two files are:

medley A script for running Medley easily

site-init A sample site-init file

You can stop the installation process at any time by typing C (Control-C).


Using the Installation Script’s Menu

To choose an option from the Installation Options Menu, type at least the first three characters of the selection. Most of the menu lists items you might want to install.

Choosing one of these options works as a toggle switch, either selecting or deselecting, depending on its previous setting. The other menu items act as commands when you

select them. "OS version" lets you pick the SunOS version(s) for which you will need matching emulators. " Directory" lets you specify where to install Medley. "!" lets you use UNIX commands if you need to.

In Figure 2-1, the user has selected for installation the Sysout, Monochrome and X Windows emulators for SunOS 4.1, Display font s, and Library modules. The menu

shows that you need 15052.8 KB of disk space to finish the installation, but only 13002 KB are available. At this point you can either deselect an option to decrease the disk

space requirements, or change the installation directory to one that has sufficient disk space.


<----------------> Installation Options Menu < >

image

image

Emulators For one or several OS versions (At least one of monochrome, color or X11-version is required for new installations)

x Monochrome - 0.5 MByte

image

image

Commands Directory - Change location of installation directory.

-- Current: /usr/share/lde 13002 KB

-- Disk-space(KByte) Available:13002 Needed:15052.8

!<Unix command> - Execute a Unix command

? or Help - Show menu instructions Redraw - Redisplay this menu

None - Unmark all options All - Mark all options Continue installation Quit installation

Select [Directory]:


Figure 2-1. S ample Inst a ll a tion Menu


Because of the disk space shortage, the script has offered [Directory] as the default next command. If that is what you want, just press Return. Otherwise, type some

other command.

For example, to deselect Library modules, type:

Select [Directory]:lib

Alternately, to find a filesystem with enough disk space, issue the following command:

Select [Directory]: !df



Filesystem

kbytes

used

avail

capacity

Mounted on

/dev/sd0a

7548

4935

1858

73%

/

/dev/sd0g

75106

51704

15891

76%

/usr

/dev/sd1g

47999

21898

21301

51%

/home

king:/shared

416928

349202

26042

93%

/share

Select [Directory]:

image


To change the installation directory, type:

Select [Directory]:dir

At the new prompt, give the directory name:

Where do you want to install Medley? [/usr/share/lde]: /share/lde

If the directory does not exist, the script will attempt to create it.


Getting a Copy Protection Key

Before starting Medley, you must first obtain a host access key from Venue. This key enables the use of Medley on one workstation. The software cannot run without the

key. You must have one key for each host on which you wish to run. Note that your current host access key will work if you move from one version of SunOS to another, or if you upgrade from an earlier version of Medley to Medley 2.0.

To obtain a key:

  1. Get the host ID of the machine on which you intend to run Medley by typing on that machine

    prompt% hostid

    310002f6

  2. Call Venue at 800-228-5325 between 9:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. PST. Outside the United States, call your local distributor.

  3. Ask for a host access key, giving the Venue representative your host ID. Venue

    provides you with a host access key, which you need during software configuration, below.

  4. If you plan to use the Medley startup script, you will be prompted for the key the first time you invoke it. The script will automatically save the key into a file for future reference.


image

CAUTION

Depending on your license agreement with Venue, your host access key may have an expiration date. After that date, your key is no longer valid.


image


Changing Configurations or Adding Options

If you forgot to install something or need to add a new emulator, you can rerun the

installation, and select only the new things you need. The installation script does not remove things.


This need arises most often when you start running X Windows and need the new emulator.


First, decide what you need to install. Then type install-medley. When you get to the Installation Options Menu, select all the new things you need and deselect

everything else. Continuing the installation from there just adds the new items.


If you have Sun-3s and you just got a SPARCstation, all you need from the new installation are the proper emulators. Everything else is the same.

image



[This page intentionally left blank]

  1. GETTING STARTED

    image


    Getting Ready

    To prepare your system to run Medley, use the following checklist:

    1. Exit suntools or any other windowing system, unless you plan to run under X (in which case you can leave X running). Medley provides its own window system and must not run simultaneously with others.

    2. Kill all your user processes (these have console as the control tty). Check to make

      sure you have killed any " selection_svc" process. If you do not perform this step, certain error messages from UNIX (e.g., file system full) cause those processes to print to the console, resulting in scrolling of the display.

    3. Check for the directory for the software, and add it to your path, if necessary:

      prompt# set path = ($path /usr/share/lde/install.sunosx)

      You can also add this to your .login file.


      Running Medley


      Running Medley Directly

      Invoke Medley by typing the name of the program, e.g.,

      prompt% lde optional-sysout -k ’thishost-key [-m memory-size ]

      If you are using either Xerox XNS or Xerox PUP Ethernet protocols, type instead

      prompt% ldeether optional-sysout -k ’thishost-key [-m memory-size ]

      This, in turn, runs lde and lets it use the Ethernet directly.

      optional-sysout is the name of a Lisp virtual memory image file (see the section Where Medley Looks for Your Sysout below). thishost-key is the key you obtained from Venue for the machine on which you are running.


      If the sysout was created on a machine with a different size display, the image will

      appear garbled for several seconds. After Lisp starts running, it readjusts the display to the current size.


      The -m flag lets you control the maximum amount of memory Medley will use. memory- size is a number in the range 8 through 32, in megabytes. (See the detailed explanation on page 25.)


      Using the Medley Shell Script

      The script will try to find a key, an appropriate emulator, and a sysout. The script

      relies on information about where the Medley software was initially installed on your system. (The installation script install-medley automatically updates this

      information for you.) The medley script assumes that you have not changed the installation subdirectory structure from when it was originally installed.


      The script will first try to find a key in the file Installation directory /

      .medleyKey.hostn ame or in ~/.medleyKey.hostn ame. Installation directory is where Medley was originally installed on your system. hostname is the name of the host for

      which the license key was issued. If neither file is foun d, you will be prompted for a key.


      medley [[em ulator ] sysout] [Command]

      image

      emulator Given a pathname or a simple name, the command will search for

      emulator as follows:


      • If emulator is a relative or absolute pathname, e.g.,

        /share/medley/emulators/lde, it will only try that pathname.


      • If emulator is a plain file name, e.g., lde, the script uses the regular UNIX search path to find it. If it cannot find it, the script looks in the installation directory for Medley at your site, e.g.,

        /usr/share/lde/install.sunos4.1/lde.


      • If you omit emulator , the script uses lde as the default value, searching for it in the same fashion as above.

        sysout The command will search for sysout as follows:


      • If sysout is a relative or absolute pathname, e.g.,

        ../applications/my.sysout, it will only try that pathname.


      • If emulator is a plain file name, e.g., my.sysout, it will look for it in the following order:

      1. Current working directory my.sysout


      2. Installation directory for Medley at your site, e.g.,

        /usr/share/lde/lispsysouts/my.sysout.


      3. Your home directory, ~/my.sysout


      4. The medley subdirectory in your home directory,

~/medley/my.sysout.



Examples

Finally, Lisp looks for a site initialization file on your Medley home directory ({DSK}). Chapter 5, Medley File Systems, describes the {DSK} device.


Medley and X Windows

Medley 2.0-S supports the X Window System, Version 11 Release 4 (X11R4). Medley

runs in a single X window; Medley’s "screen" is displayed in that window, and you use Medley as usual.


Starting X Windows

Start the X server on your console. Use the xinit command.

If necessary, start a window manager as a client of X ( xinit often starts a window manager). The window manager provides many window management functions, such as moving, resizing and iconifying the window. Medley has no window management function of its own.


Running Medley Remotely

You can run Medley on one machine, with the window on some other machine. To do so, perform these steps on the machine whose keyboard and display you will be using:

  1. Add the host name to execute the Medley access control list:

    xhost + hostname

  2. Open a new xterm and rlogin to the Sun Workstation on which Medley is to run. Set the environment variable DISPLAY to the host name of the server machine:

    setenv DISPLAY servername:0

  3. Set the LDEKBDTYPE environment variable to tell Medley what kind of keyboard you will be using. Possible values are:

    type3 Sun Type 3 keyboard type4 Sun Type 4 keyboard rs6000 IBM RS/6000 or PS/2

    dec3100 DECstation 3100 or 5000

    image


    hp9000 HP9000 Series 700 or 800

    X Generic X terminal

    If you don’t set LDEKBDTYPE, it will default to X. The advantage of specifying a

    specific keyboard lies in how Medley treats the special function keys. The specific keyboard maps maximize the usefulness of keys marked, e.g., "Find". The generic keyboard code cannot do that reliably.

  4. Start up Medley.

A new window for Medley will appear on the X server’s screen.


The Medley Window

Normally, Medley uses the whose screen. Under X, Medley’s "screen" appears in a

single X window. Medley’s screen is slightly smaller than the screen you are using to display it; if you make the X window full–screen–size, you see Medley’s entire screen. If it is smaller, you will need to scroll to see parts of the screen.

The scroll bars (at the right and bottom of the X window) control what parts of Medley’s screen appears in the window. Use the vertical scrollbar to scroll up and down, and the horizontal scrollbar to scroll left and right. The gravity buttons (at the lower right

corner) set the bitgravity of the display window. Click the mouse button on one of these areas. The shade pattern is moved to the clicked area, and the bitgravity is set in the corresponding corner on the display window. The bitgravity determines how reshaping the X window affect s what part of the Medley screen is visible.


Environment Variables



Medley on the Sun uses several environment variables. They can be set from the shell with the setenv UNIX command. By convention, environment variable names use

uppercase rather than lowercase letters, e.g., LDEDESTSYSOUT. The Medley

environment variables are listed below, with a reference to sections in this Guide where further information can be foun d.


LDEKBDTYPE See the Medley and X Windows or Sun Type 4 Keyboard sections in this chapter.

LDEINIT See the Site Initialization File section in Chapter 4.

LDESRCESYSOUT See the Where Medley Looks for Your Sysout section in

this chapter.

LDEDESTSYSOUT See the Saving Your State section in Chapter 4. LDESHELL See the UNIXCHAT section of the Lisp Library Modules . LDEFILETIMEOUT See the File System Errors subsection in Chapter 5.


Keyboard Interpretation

This section describes how Medley interprets the Sun Type 3 and Type 4 keyboards. Except when running under X, Medley perform s its own keyboard interpretation,

taking raw up/down transitions directly from the keyboard. Medley uses its own key


numbering scheme; key numbers are used by Lisp functions such as IL:KEYDOWNP and

IL:KEYACTION.

These key assignments were chosen to maximize compatibility with both the Xerox workstation keyboard and the normal Sun keyboards. You can attach a Sun Type 3 or

Type 4 keyboard template, which also shows the Medley keyboard assignments, to your Sun Type 3 or Type 4 keyboard. Both templates are included with your Medley

documentation set.


Sun Type 3 Keyboard

Figure 3-1 shows the key number assignments for the Sun Type 3 keyboard. Figures 3 - 2 through 3 - 4 show Medley’s key assignments for the Sun Type 3 keypads.


61

91

92

63

14

62

111

89

90

46

97

99

100

67

68

101

66

104

80

13

33

32

17

16

1

0

2

4

53

22

8

10

59

105

45

34

19

18

3

48

49

51

6

23

25

11

58

29

15

36

21

20

5

35

50

52

38

9

26

43

28

44

41

40

24

37

7

39

54

55

27

42

12

60

71

56

31

57

93

47

73

74

75

81

82

83

84

85

87

94

69

70

98

76

72


image

Figure 3-1. Sun Type 3 Key Nu mbering



Stop

Again

Help

Undo

Same

Move

Open

Copy

FindDe

lete

NumSc Lock

rol Lock

Bl reak

7

Home

8

image

9

PgUP

4

5

6




1

End

2


image

3

PgDN

Ins

DOIT

Caps Lock


image

image

Figure 3-2. Sun Type 3 Figure 3-3. Sun Type 3

Left Key P ad Right Key P ad

image



image image

r

enter

Bold

Italic

Case

Strikeout

Underline

Super La

Sub Sm

rgeMa aller

rgin

Back Word

Esc

! 1

@ 2

# 3

$ 4

% 5

^ 6

& 7

* 8

( 9

) 0

_

-

+

=

|

\

~ ‘

Tab

Q

q

W

w

E

e

R

r

T

t

Y

y

U

u

I

i

O

o

P

p

{

[

} Ba

]

ckspace

Ctrl

A

a

S

s

D

d

F

f

G

g

H

h

J

j

K

k

L

l

:

;

"

Return

Shift

Z

z

X

x

C

c

V

v

B

b

N

n

M

m

<

,

>

.

?

/

Shift

LF

Caps

Meta

Space

Expand

Next

C

image



Figure 3-4. Sun Type 3 Center Key P ad Interpret a tion


Sun Type 4 Keyboard

Figure 3-5 illustrates the keyboard interpretation for the Sun Type 4 keyboard.Figures 3-6 through 3-8 show the keyboard and the left and right key pads for the Sun Type 4 keyboard.

NOTES: In SunOS 4.0, the NEXT (ALT/GRAPH) key on the Type 4 keyboard is inaccessible. Later versions of SunOS fix this.

Medley cannot detect whether it is running on a workstation with a Type 4 keyboard when running SunOS 4.0, 4.0.1, or 4.1. To make it work correctly on your workstation, enter the following before you start running Medley:

setenv LDEKBDTYPE type4


61

91

109

63

14

89

111

62

90

46

92

97

99

100

67

68

101

66

104

80

106

107

108

105

13

33

32

17

16

1

0

2

4

53

22

8

10

59

15

34

19

18

3

48

49

51

6

23

25

11

58

29

0


44

36

21

20

5

35

50

52

38

9

26

43

28

45

41

40

24

37

7

39

54

55

27

42

12

60

71

56

31

86

57

88

93

47

75

110

74

73

64

65

95

96

81

82

83


102

84

85

87

94

69

70


76

98

13

Figure 3-5. Sun Type 4 Key Nu mbering



Stop


Again


Props


Undo


Same


Copy


Open


Move


Find


Delete


Help


Break


PrSc

scroll lock

num lock

=


/


*


-

7

Home

8


image

9

PgUP


+

4

image


5

6

image


1

End

2


image

3

PgDN


DOIT


Ins


Del


Figure 3-6. Sun Type 4 Figure 3-7. Sun Type 4

Left Key P ad Right Key P ad


F1

Center

F2

Bold

F3

Italic

F4

Case

F5

Strike

F6

Under

F7

Super

F8

Large

F9

Margin

F10

F11

F12

|

\

Delete Word


Esc

! 1

@ 2

# 3

$ 4

% 5

^ 6

& 7

* 8

( 9

) 0

_

-

+

=

Back Space


Tab

Q

q

W

w

E

e

R

r

T

t

Y

y

U

u

I

i

O

o

P

p

{

[

}

]



Return


Ctrl

A

a

S

s

D

d

F

f

G

g

H

h

J

j

K

k

L

l

:

;

"

~ ‘


Shift

Z

z

X

x

C

c

V

v

B

b

N

n

M

m

<

,

>

.

?

/


Shift


LF


Caps


Meta

Left Spc


Space

Right Spc


Expand


Next


Figure 3-8. Sun Type 4 Center Key P ad Interpret a tion

image



[This page intentionally left blank]

  1. USING MEDLEY ON THE SUN WORKSTATION

    image


    Once the system administrator has installed Medley software on the Sun, Lisp users can customize their Medley Lisp environments. This chapter provides basic

    information to get you started in the Medley environment on a Sun Workstation.


    Setting Up a Site Init File

    image

    The users at a given site generally print to the same printers, load library files from the same directory, and so on. Medley uses variables to supply defaults for such things.

    The obvious place to set these variables is in one common initialization file. That is the Site Init File’s role.

    The Site Init File is a file of Lisp expressions that is loaded when you start Medley with a fresh LISP.SYSOUT.

    The following Lisp symbols should be set in your site init file:


    IL:USERGREETFILES [Variable]

    image

    A list of templates to search for the place where individuals should find their personal init files. If this is not set in the site init file, no personal init file is used. The list

    should be similar to the following:

    (({file-server}< USER >LISP>INIT.LCOM)

    ({file-server}< USER >LISP>INIT) ({file-server}< USER >INIT.LISP))

    IL:DISPLAYFONTDIRECTORIES [Variable]

    image

    A list of directories to search when the system is looking for display font s. The site

    initialization file should set it to a list of strings, each containing a complete pathname for font files, e.g., ("{UNIX}/usr/local/lde/fonts/display/ presentation/").

    IL:INTERPRESSFONTDIRECTORIES [Variable]

    image

    A list of directories to search when the system is looking for Interpress font widths.


    IL:DIRECTORIES [Variable]

    image

    The list of paths to search for files that are not foun d in the current (Lisp) connected directory.


    IL:LISPUSERSDIRECTORIES [Variable]

    image

    The list of paths to search for library and LispUsers’ files. Remember that every path in this list should also be in DIRECTORIES.

    IL:DEFAULTPRINTINGHOST [Variable]

    image

    A list of names of default printers.


    IL:DEFAULTPRINTERTYPE [Variable]

    image

    The default printer type, e.g., POSTSCRIPT.


    XCL:*LONG-SITE-NAME* [Variable]

    image

    The value of the function XCL:LONG-SITE-NAME, e.g., "Frobnitz, Baz and Lispers, Incorporated."

    XCL:*SHORT-SITE-NAME* [Variable]

    image

    The value of the Common Lisp function XCL:SHORT-SITE-NAME, e.g., "Frobco".

    IL: \ BeginDST [Variable]

    image

    The day of the year on or before which Daylight Savings Time takes effect (i.e., the

    Sunday on or immediately preceding this day). Must be set to 98 in the USA if Lisp is to perform time computations correctly (subject, of course, to future legislation). If you are in a region where Daylight Savings Time is not observed, set the value to 367.


    IL: \ EndDST [Variable]

    image

    The day of the year on or before which Daylight Savings Time ends. Must be set to 305 in the USA.


    Setting Up a Personal Init File

    Your personal init file keeps track of the location of your home directory and windows layout; it also remembers which library files you always load.


    Your personal init file is a file of Lisp expressions that is loaded and run after the site

    init file. You can create it either as a text file, or have Medley’s File Manager help you. Your initialization file is normally ~ /INIT.LCOM


    Saving Your State

    On the Sun, lde is an ordinary UNIX program that allocates a 45 MB data area, reads into that area several megabytes of data (the sysout), and modifies it there. Under

    UNIX, that program’s data requirements (which include the sysout) are handled by

    UNIX; all Medley does is modify in "memory" a copy of your original sysout file. UNIX, transparently to Medley, handles all real memory swapping. This has several

    consequences related to starting, saving, and restarting sysouts.

    On Xerox workstations, the virtual memory partition is updated periodically and used to store new pages as they are allocated or flushed from the real memory of the

    machine. For example, LOGOUT and SAVEVM write out only those pages of data which are different from what might already be in the virtual memory file.

    On the Sun Workstation, however, the contents of virtual memory are only written to a file by an explicit call to SAVEVM, LOGOUT, SYSOUT, or MAKESYS. This file is an ordinary SunOS file (normally ~/lisp.virtualmem). The entire virtual memory, which may be many megabytes of data, is written out there.

    On the Sun Workstation, starting anew from a saved virtual memory file requires

    reading it into memory. On the Xerox workstation, it is necessary to first copy the

    saved sysout to the virtual memory file and then read it in. Thus, restarting a saved sysout or virtual memory file is significantly faster on a Sun Workstation.


    The file that LOGOUT and SAVEVM writes is normally ~/lisp.virtualmem (i.e., the file lisp.virtualmem on the user’s home directory). However, the environment variable LDEDESTSYSOUT can be used to override this default. For example, you might want to

    keep virtual memory images on /user/local. During a demonstration where you do

    not want the memory image saved, you can reset LDEDESTSYSOUT to /dev/null. You can use the C-Shell command setenv to do this, e.g.:

    prompt% setenv LDEDESTSYSOUT "/dev/null"

    Cursor tracking interferes with writing out the screen bitmap as part of the Medley memory image. For this reason, Medley takes the cursor down before saving a virtual

    memory image as part of LOGOUT, SAVEVM, SYSOUT, or MAKESYS. When this happens,

    the message

    Saving VMem, taking mouse down

    appears in the prompt window, and cursor tracking is disabled.

    Because the virtual memory file need not already exist to run Medley, the functions

    LOGOUT and SAVEVM can signal the following file errors : File-System-Resources-Exceeded Protection-Violation

    File-Wont-Open

    Even if some errors occur while saving a virtual memory, the old destination file is safe. Saving does not overwrite the old virtual memory file. The saving virtual memory file is named with "temp", such as lisp.virtualmemtemp. The file is renamed to a

    specified name, such as lisp.virtualmem, at the last sequence of the save.

    When the user does not have enough space to save the virtual memory, the old virtual memory file can be overwritten by setting IL:\LDEDESTOVERWRITE to T. The initial value of IL:\LDEDESTOVERWRITE is NIL. In some cases, even if the user tries to

    overwrite, there may still not be enough space.

    In Medley, a "page" is 512 bytes. Under SunOS, the page size is variable; some Sun Workstations use 8 Kbyte pages. In general, Medley functions deal only in units of Medley pages, e.g., the SIZE attribute of files is in terms of 512–byte pages, (VMEMSIZE) returns the number of 512–byte pages in use.

    (IL:LOGOUT FAS T ) [Function]

    image

    Lets you exit Medley cleanly. The parameter FAS T indicates whether resumption of

    the same environment is desirable and in what fashion. Before exiting, disk buffer s are written, and network connections subject to timeout are closed.

    If FAS T is NIL, LOGOUT first saves your virtual memory in a file. Change the file name by setting the UNIX environment variable LDEDESTSYSOUT. If this variable is not set, the file saved is ~/lisp.virtualmem (i.e., lisp.virtualmem on the user’s home

    directory).

    If FAS T is T, Medley stops without writing the virtual memory file. It is not possible to resume execution in the same image.

    (IL:SAVEVM ) [Function]

    image

    Saves your state, but does not exit. It causes the current virtual memory image to be written to the location specified by the environment variable LDEDESTSYSOUT, if this variable is set; otherwise it is written to ~/lisp.virtualmem. This allows Lisp to


    continue. Execution in Medley continues after memory is saved; thus, SAVEVM operates as a sort of checkpoint of the current working state. SAVEVM can cause the following

    error:

    File-System-Resources-Exceeded.


    (IL:SYSOUT FILE ) [Function]

    image

    Perform s the equivalent of SAVEVM and then copies the saved image to FILE for devices other than {DSK} and {UNIX} (e.g., XNS file servers). (See Chapter 5, Medley File

    Systems, for further information on {DSK} and {UNIX}.) SYSOUT can cause the

    following error:

    File-System-Resources-Exceeded.


    Sun-Specific Environment Functions

    image


    System Environment Functions and Variables

    These functions, which interrogate the system environment, operate as described below when they are invoked on the Sun Workstation:


    (IL:REALMEMORYSIZE) [Function]

    image

    On some machines, returns the total amount of real memory available; does not work on a Sun Workstation (i.e., returns a meaningless value).


    (CL:MACHINE-TYPE) [Function]

    image

    Returns a string identifying the type of computer hardware the system is running

    under. On the Sun–3 workstation MACHINE-TYPE returns "mc68020". On a Sun–4 workstation , MACHINE-TYPE returns the string "sparc".


    (IL:MACHINETYPE) [Function]

    image

    Identifies the generic type of Lisp machine in use. On the Sun Workstation, it returns the symbol IL:MAIKO.


    (CL:MACHINE-VERSION) [Function]

    image

    Returns a string identifying the version of the emulator running; e.g., "Microcode version: 279, memory size: 16384".


    (CL:MACHINE-INSTANCE) [Function]

    image

    Returns a string containing the workstation host ID (in hexadecimal) and the host name.


    IL:LISP-RELEASE-VERSION [Variable]

    image

    Identifies the release number within a single major release name. In Medley 2.0, IL:LISP-RELEASE-VERSION is 2.0 While IL:MAKESYSNAME does not change, IL:LISP-RELEASE-VERSION always changes with each new sysout release. This variable did not exist in the Medley 1.0-S sysout.


    IL: \ MY.NSADDRESS [Variable]

    image

    Fills in the fields of the network address with the host ID if Medley is run without the Ethernet enabled. Programs that use the network address as a unique identifier should

    be aware that the value could vary from session to session depending on whether or not the Ethernet is enabled. (Refer to Chapter 14 of the Interlisp-D Reference Manual for further information.)


    VM Functions

    The biggest difference is a change in terminology. On Xerox 1100 series workstations, Lisp itself handles all virtual memory operations directly, so the terms "sysout" and "virtual memory image" can be used interchangeably. The running sysout resides in a reserved area on the workstation local disk (the virtual memory partition) that Lisp

    reads from and writes to as it needs to move pages into and out of physical memory.


    (IL:VMEMSIZE) [Function]

    image

    Returns the number of 512–byte pages of the Medley virtual memory that are in use. This number is a good estimate of the size of a SYSOUT, MAKESYS, or SAVEVM virtual memory file.


    (IL:VMEM.PURE.STATE ON / OFF ) [Variable]

    image

    Has no effect on the Sun Workstation. The virtual memory file is not modified except by an explicit (LOGOUT) or (SAVEVM).


    IL:BACKGROUNDPAGEFREQ [Variable]

    image

    Has no effect on the Sun Workstation. The virtual memory file is not modified except by an explicit (LOGOUT) or (SAVEVM).


    You can control how much virtual memory Medley uses by using the -m switch, as described below.


    ldeether [<SYSOUT-name>] [-m<memory-size>] [other options]

    image

    [Command]

    Allows you to specify an arbitrary virtual memorey size for Medley.

    -m Specifies the memory size

    memory-size 8 through 32 Mbytes

    When you use -m, the value of IL: \ STORAGEFULLSTATE in the sysout you start should not be 3 or 4. Those values mean it already used more than the 8-Mbyte space in the sysout. Because of the Medley storage management architecture, the virtual memory

    size cannot be changed after IL: \ STORAGEFULLSTATE has been set to 3 or 4. This value can be examined just before ( IL:LOGOUT) if you want to specify the virtual

    memory size during the next start-up.

    Example: ldeether /usr/LISP.SYSOUT -m 16

    This example means 16 Mbytes of virtual space will be assigned for Lisp.


    Stopping Lisp Temporarily


    (IL:SUSPEND-LISP) [Function]

    image

    Suspends, temporarily, the UNIX process running Medley. Using the fg C-Shell command, the Medley process can be continued from the C-Shell where it was started. SUSPEND-LISP has no effect on Xerox Lisp workstations. This function should not be used during I/O operations (file or network).


    Login Functions

    This section describes the interaction between the usernames and passwords in Medley and the SunOS usernames and passwords. The functions IL:USERNAME,

    IL:SETUSERNAME, IL:SETPASSWORD, and IL:LOGIN access the username/password

    database used by Medley in network operations. (For further information, see Chapter 24 of the Interlisp-D Reference Manual .) When Medley is started, this database

    contains only the SunOS username, with no password. Except for this, there is no

    interrelation between these Medley functions and SunOS usernames and passwords.

    IL:USERNAME returns the SunOS login name under which the emulator was started. A subsequent IL:SETUSERNAME or IL:LOGIN changes IL:USERNAME, and the default login name for network access to XNS and PUP hosts. However, it does not change the SunOS login name or access capabilities for files on {DSK} or {UNIX}. (See Chapter 5,

    Medley File Systems, for detailed information on {DSK} and {UNIX}.) Because it

    doesn’t change the SunOS login name, it won’t change the author name on SunOS files created from Lisp.

    The following functions apply to login activities.


    (IL:UNIX-USERNAME) [Function]

    image

    Returns a string consisting of the username of the SunOS process running Medley. Returns NIL if one of the following conditions apply:


    (IL:UNIX-FULLNAME) [Function]

    image

    Returns a string containing the full name of the owner of the SunOS process running Medley. Returns NIL if the user is not running under UNIX or an error occurs.


    (IL:LOGIN HOS T FLG DIRECTORY MSG ) [Function]

    image

    Attempts to maintain user IDs and passwords for network as well as local access. If

    HOS T is NIL, this function attempts to perform the SunOS setuid operation. Unless you are running as root, this will not change your SunOS login.


    Environment Inquiry

    The following functions return the values of UNIX environment variables or machine parameters. They return NIL if run in Medley on Xerox 1100 series workstations.


    (IL:UNIX-GETENV S TRING ) [Function]

    image

    Returns the value of the environment variable with the given name. The argument

    S TRING should be the name of a UNIX environment variable. For example, (UNIX- GETENV "HOME") might return the user’s home directory .


    (IL:UNIX-GETPARM S TRING ) [Function]

    image

    Returns the value of one of a few built-in parameters. The argument S TRING should be the name of one of the following UNIX environment variables:



    Variable

    If running on

    this hard w are


    Returns

    "MACH"

    Sun-4 Sun-3

    RS/6000 HP9000 DEC3100

    PS/2

    "sparc" "mc68000"

    "rs/6000" "hp9000"

    "mips"

    "i386"

    "ARCH"

    Sun-4 Sun-3

    RS/6000 HP9000 DEC3100

    PS/2

    "sun4"

    "sun3" "rs/6000" "hp9000"

    "dec3100"

    "ps/2"

    "HOSTNAME"

    All

    Returns the local host name

    "HOSTID"

    All

    Returns the local host identification number

    as a hexadecimal string


    Display and Keyboard Functions and Variables

    Some Medley display and keyboard functions and variables operate differently on the Sun Workstation.

    The following functions have no effect on a Sun Workstation, and always return NIL:

    IL:CHANGEBACKGROUNDBORDER IL:VIDEORATE IL:SETMAINTPANEL IL:VIDEOCOLOR

    The functions IL:BEEPON, IL:BEEPOFF, IL:PLAYTUNE, IL:RINGBELLS generate

    monotones.


    (IL:BEEPON FREQ) [Function]

    image

    Turns on the keyboard tone generator on the Sun Workstation. The FREQ argument is ignored.


    (IL:BEEPOFF) [Function]

    image

    Turns off the keyboard tone generator.


    (IL:PLAYTUNE TUNEPAIR S ) [Function]

    image

    Sounds tones, but ignores the frequencies of the values in TUNEPPAIR S .


    (IL:RINGBELLS) [Function]

    image

    Causes the machine to beep several times.


    Timers and Clocks

    UNIX is a timesharing operating system. When Medley is running, other programs can be running at the same time on the same workstation.


    On a Xerox workstation running Lisp, CPU time could be computed exactly from

    elapsed time after subtracting known system overhead. To allow older Interlisp-D

    programs to work unchanged, the timer functions were modified to allow programs that accounted for time on Xerox workstations to continue to run. Time is categorized as follows:

    CPU time: The total amount of time spent executing Medley’s process in user mode.

    SWAP time: The total time spent running other processes (Elapsed time – (CPU time + Disk time).

    Disk I/O time: The total amount of time spent in the system executing on the behalf of Medley’s process.

    The Medley functions CLOCK, TIME, and the like get the time of day directly from SunOS. The function SETTIME has no effect on the Sun Workstation.


    IL: \ RCLKMILLISECOND [Variable]

    image

    The number of clock "ticks" in a millisecond. On the Sun Workstation, this value is always 1000. All of the timer functions that deal in clock ticks will do their

    computation in microseconds. Note, however, that the Sun Workstation does not have that accurate a clock resolution. While clock resolution varies from one operating

    system version to another, it often has a resolution no better than 1/60th of a second.


    Miscellaneous Operational Differences

    The stack and virtual memory handling functions on the Sun Workstation are

    implemented differently from the way they are on the Xerox workstations. For this reason, the "cur sor bars" used on the Xerox workstations are not used on the Sun Workstation.

    When working in Medley on a Sun workstation, you should periodically load a fresh sysout. Older Medley sysouts don’t run as well as "fresh" sysouts due to a number of factors such as fragmentation of memory, increased working set, more objects taking up various spaces (e.g., gc tables), reduced symbol space.


    On Xerox workstations, users are reminded to reload fresh sysouts, because they

    eventually fill up their sysout partition. With Sun workstations, there is no such limit reminder, so users’ sysouts tend to grow to the maximum size (32 MB), and thus run slower and slower.


    Console Messages

    Under SunOS, various system processes and operations attempt to log information on

    the console. Since Medley takes over the screen, console messages are redirected (except when running under X); a background process in Medley causes them to appear in the prompt window.

    However, when Medley is run remotely (i.e., not from the console), most console, or operating system, messages are printed in the prompt window. However, some

    messages may also appear in the middle of the Medley display screen or on the remote tty. This occurs because UNIX is often confused about where to send messages. Note that Medley is normally run remotely only for debugging purposes.


    image

    CAUTION

    Critical UNIX system processes can hang if the buffer holding console

    messages fills. Medley uses a temporary file, /tmp/XXXX-lisp.log, where

    XXXX is the user’s login name, to buffer console messages before printing

    them. Do not delete this log file while Medley is running. If the log file is deleted, console messages can no longer be printed in the Medley prompt window.


    image



    [This page intentionally left blank]

  2. MEDLEY FILE SYSTEMS

image


This chapter discusses the conventions for using files from Medley.


File Naming Conventions

image

In Lisp, a file name (pathname) consists of a collection of fields: the host, directory, name, extension and version . These fields are optional. The standard Lisp syntax for these fields is:

{host}<directory >name.extension;version

The directory field can be a directory path consisting of a sequence of directory and subdirectory components. Slashes ( / ) and right angle brackets (>) can be used to

delimit a directory name; there is no distinction made between them. Square brackets ([]) are not acceptable as directory delimiters.

Duplicated directory delimiters are treated as a single delimiter. Thus, the following two file names specify the same file:

{DSK}<LISP>USERS>FOO.;1

{DSK}</LISP/USERS/>FOO.;1


Hosts that Medley Supports

image

{CORE} Creates "files" in memory; useful for quick temporary files

{LPT} Creates files that are automatically sent to your printer

{NULL} Creates a file that does nothing

{DSK} and Give you access to the Sun’s file systems; the rest of the chapter

{UNIX} concentrates on them.


The above hosts are described in more detail in the IRM.


Using SunOS Files from Medley

image

You can access any mounted SunOS file system directly from Lisp. The mounted file system is available as an I/O device of the Lisp environment. This file system appears as the local disk of Lisp, even though it may be a remotely mounted file system of

networked Sun file servers.

Many of the file devices to which the Medley environment can talk, including PUP, XNS file servers, the {CORE} device, and others, have facilities that are not directly

supported by SunOS. For example, many file systems have file version numbers and case insensitive file search conventions.

Medley on the Sun Workstation has two distinct "host" names that can be used to access the SunOS file system. These host names are provided for compatibility with existing applications and tools. They also simultaneously allow natural interaction with the SunOS file system. The names are:


{DSK} On the Xerox workstation, {DSK} gave you access to your local hard disk; to use {DSK}, you had to create a directory on each disk partition you wanted to use. On the Sun Workstation, in contrast, the {DSK}

device lets you access the file system using similar conventions to those used for {DSK} on the Xerox workstation local disk devices. In

particular, {DSK} files have version numbers; {DSK} file name recognition also ignores the case of letters.

{UNIX} The {UNIX} device lets you use the mounted file systems with the

normal naming conventions of the SunOS file system. {UNIX} files do not have version numbers, and the file name recognition treats

lowercase letters as distinct from their uppercase equivalents.

File streams can be opened or closed on both devices. The reason for having both devices is to more easily support the running of applications that were originally developed on a Xerox workstation, while still allowing new applications to interact more naturally with UNIX.

NOTE: Both {DSK} and {UNIX} work as filters. They act as pointers to a device. On 11xxs, {DSK}foo is the same as {DSK}<lispfiles>foo. On the Sun,

{DSK}foo is the same as $HOME/foo ~user / foo.


Common {DSK} and {UNIX} Naming Conventions

then creating it under the new name. For example, if you have the following {DSK}

files

From {DSK} From SunOS

foo.c;1 foo.c (linked to foo.c.~2~)

foo.c;2 foo.c.~1~

fee.c;1 foo.c.~2~

fee.c;2 fee.c (linked to fee.c.~2~)

image


fee.c.~1~ fee.c.~2~

  1. MEDLEY FILE SYSTEMS


    and you rename "foo.c" to "fee.c", your renamed {DSK} files and the linked SunOS files would appear as:

    From {DSK} From SunOS

    foo.c;1 foo.c (linked to foo.c.~1~)

    fee.c;1 foo.c.~1~

    fee.c;2 fee.c (linked to fee.c.~3~)

    fee.c;3 fee.c.~1~

    fee.c.~2~

    fee.c.~3~ (renamed file)


    myfile.~12x~), the suffix is regarded as part of the file name.

    From {DSK} From SunOS

    myfile.~12x~;1 myfile.~12x~


    Pathnames

    A pathname on {DSK} is always case insensitive. When the user specifies a file, the

    {DSK} device handler first searches for the file with the specified name. If no such file is foun d, it then searches for a file with the same spelling but different case.

    Most Lisp functions, such as FINDFILE and INFILEP,which return pathnames return them with the original case when they are applied on files on {DSK} when IL:*DSK- UPPER-CASE-FILE-NAMES* is NIL. If IL:*UPPER-CASE-FILE-NAMES* is not NIL,

    these functions return only uppercase pathnames. The only exception is the function

    DIRECTORY , which returns a list of pathnames. The case of the pathnames is

    controlled by the global variable IL:*UPPER-CASE-FILE-NAMES* in a similar manner to IL:*DSK-UPPER-CASE-FILE-NAMES*.

    If a pathname on {DSK} has no directory specification, a tilde-slash combination ( ~/) is used, i.e., the Lisp directory specification {DSK}foo is the equivalent of {UNIX}~/foo.


    {UNIX} Naming Conventions

    For the {UNIX} device, file name translation takes place only on the directory. An initial left angle bracket (<) is treated as if it were an initial slash (/); both signify a path relative to the SunOS file system root directory; if there is no initial left angle

    bracket or slash, the directory is relative to the current working directory. Initially this is the working directory where Lisp was started; you can change it using the CHDIR

    function, described below. Tilde (~) is translated to the user’s home directory.

    For example, {UNIX}myfile/abc means the file abc on the ./myfile directory.

    The {UNIX} device does not recognize version numbers, does not return them, and ignores them for recognition.

    No case translation or recognition is done; upper- and lowercase letters are treated as distinct.

    image


    Examples:

    {UNIX} Name From Lisp File Name From SunOS

    <foo>fee>bar.baz;1 /foo/fee/bar.baz;1

    <foo>fee/bar.;1 /foo/fee/bar.;1

    <foo/fee> /foo/fee/

    </foo/fee/> /foo/fee/

    /foo/fee/bar.~1~ /foo/fee/bar.~1~

    /foo/fee/ /foo/fee/

    In the first two examples the ;1 is treated as part of the file name, not the version number. In the last two examples that translation is not done.


    Directories

    In places where Lisp expects a directory name, {UNIX} paths must end with a slash (/).


    Directory Enumeration

    You cannot use the wildcard character, asterisk (*), in subdirectories for either {DSK}

    or {UNIX} devices. For example

    >(DIRECTORY ’{DSK}/users/x*/foo) NIL

    Enumeration of files in directories differ s between {DSK} and {UNIX} devices. On the

    {DSK} device, a versionless file which has a link to the highest version file is not enumerated in a directory.

    On the {UNIX} device, all files are enumerated in a directory. For instance, if the following SunOS files linked with foo.c.~2~ exist

    foo.c foo.c.~1~ foo.c.~2~

    the {DSK} directory enumeration would look like this:

    >(DIRECTORY ’{DSK}/users/venue/*) ({DSK}/users/venue/foo.c;1

    {DSK}/users/venue/foo.c;2)

    The {UNIX} directory enumeration, on the other hand, would look like this:

    >(DIRECTORY ’{UNIX}/users/venue/*) ({UNIX}/users/venue/foo.c

    {UNIX}/users/venue/foo.c.~1~

    {UNIX}/users/venue/foo.c.~2~)


    Directory Creation

    {DSK} When you write a new file on {DSK}, if the directory named in a

    pathname does not exist, the {DSK} device handler creates the directory automatically. This feature is provided for compatibility with other

    Interlisp-D implementations.


    If you try to "connect" to a nonexistent directory (using the CONN Exec command or the function IL:CNDIR), Medley returns the message

    Nonexistent directory


    {UNIX} The {UNIX} device does not support such directory creation. An attempt to create a file on a nonexistent directory results in an error.

    {UNIX}/users/venue/foo.c.~2~)


    Directory Deletion

    Neither {UNIX} nor {DSK} support automatic directory deletion. To delete a directory you must use the SunOS C-Shell command rmdir.


    Open File Limit

    The number of simultaneously open {DSK} and {UNIX} files must fall within the

    SunOS limits for a process. For OS 3.4, this number of open files may be configured,

    with 30 as the maximum permissible number of open files per process. This means that it is not possible to have more than 30 files open for a process, minus whatever files

    Medley has open for its own use, at any one time in the Medley system. If you try to

    open too many files, the system call error number 24, Too many open files, appears in the prompt window.

    For OS 4.0, the maximum number of files/processes that can be open at one time is 64, unless your kernel is configured otherwise.


    Default Pathname

    If no path is given, the {DSK} device defaults to the user’s home directory, tilde-slash (~/). The {UNIX} device defaults to the current working directory. This current working directory can be changed with the CHDIR function. The current working directory is

    also used to resolve the interpretation of the period (.) and double period (..) specifications at the beginning of a {DSK} pathname.


    (IL:CHDIR PATHNAME ) [Function]

    image

    Changes the current working directory for the current invocation of Lisp. For example,

    (CHDIR "{DSK}~/subdir/") (OPENSTREAM "{DSK}./foo" ...)

    opens the SunOS file ~/subdir/foo.

    When PATHNAME does not end with a slash (/) or right angle bracket (>), the whole

    PATHNAME is treated as a directory name:

    (CHDIR ’{DSK}<users>local>)

    If PATHNAME is NIL, CHDIR tries to change the current working directory to the

    current connected directory. If the directory is connected to devices other than {DSK} or

    {UNIX}, the error message

    Bad Host Name

    appears, followed by the host name of the current connected directory.

    image


    If the PATHNAME does not exist, the error message

    No-Such-Directory

    appears followed by the system echo of the pathname.


    File Attributes

    image

    This section describes how the various file attributes are treated by Lisp on the Sun Workstation and what they translate to in SunOS.

    GETFILEINFO obtains file attributes and SETFILEINFO sets the attributes.


    WRITEDATE and CREATIONDATE [File Attributes]

    image

    Resets the date to the current time whenever the contents of a file are modified. This only works for the owner of the file. Since UNIX does not naturally support more than one date for file modification, the WRITEDATE and CREATIONDATE are treated

    identically by Lisp functions OPENSTREAM, OPENFILE, GETFILEINFO, and by the {DSK}

    and {UNIX} devices.


    TYPE [File Attribute]

    image

    Sets the TYPE property of files; normally either TEXT or BINARY. However, UNIX does not distinguish between TEXT and BINARY files. Normally, programs will infer the type by the file extension, using the Lisp variables DEFAULTFILETYPE and DEFAULTFILETYPELIST. This is the convention used by Medley. If no file extension is given, the value in DEFAULTFILETYPE is used. SETFILEINFO cannot change the TYPE attribute.


    EOL [File Attribute]

    image

    Returns the end–of–line convention. Both the {DSK} device and {UNIX} use line feed (LF) as the default EOL convention for text. The EOL for binary files is carriage return (CR). EOL uses the TYPE property of files. (The TYPE property of a file depends on the

    file extension and the DEFAULTFILETYPE and DEFAULTFILETYPELIST variables). If the TYPE property of a file is TEXT, LF (=10) is used as EOL. If the TYPE property of a file is BINARY, CR (=13) is used as EOL.

    NOTE: EOL conventions on {DSK} are not compatible with those on Xerox workstations .

    AUTHOR [File Attribute]

    image

    Returns the author of the file, i.e., the login name of the user who created it. This attribute cannot be changed.


    PROTECTION [File Attribute]

    image

    Returns file protection attributes. The file protection attributes of files under the

    SunOS cannot be directly manipulated from inside Lisp. It is necessary to use the UNIX

    chmod command to change file protection bits.


    SIZE [File Attribute]

    image

    Returns the file size. For compatibility with other Lisp environments running on Xerox workstations, the SIZE attribute is computed as the length of the file (in bytes) divided by 512 (rounded up).

    NOTE: SETFILEINFO lets you change the SIZE attribute of I/O streams and output streams. However, a file cannot be expanded this way.


    File Variables

    image

    This section discusses how certain file variables are used by Medley in SunOS.


    IL:FileTypeConfirmFlg [Variable]

    image

    The file–type attribute of a file on {DSK} or {UNIX} is decided from its extension, DEFAULTFILETYPELIST and DEFAULTFILETYPE. Extensions of binary files should be registered in DEFAULTFILETYPELIST. When this rule is broken, a hardcopy of files on

    {DSK} and {UNIX} may confuse the printers. So when you try to hardcopy a file whose extension is not registered in DEFAULTFILETYPELIST, a menu is invoked to confirm the file type. Text or binary can be selected. The invocation of this menu can be stopped by setting IL:FileTypeConfirmFlg to NIL. The default value of IL:FileTypeConfirmFlg is T.

    When extensions of binary files are not registered in DEFAULTFILETYPELIST, copy or rename from a DSK/UNIX device to a non–DSK/UNIX device also may cause file type confusion. This type of copy or rename results in one of the following warning

    messages in the prompt window, as appropriate:

    Extension of {DSK}foo.fee;1 isn’t in DEFAULTFILETYPELIST. {CORE}foo.fee;1 was copied as TEXT.

    This message can be stopped by set FileTypeConfirmFlg to NIL.

    Extension of {DSK}foo.fee;1 isn’t in DEFAULTFILETYPELIST. {CORE}foo.fee;1 was renamed as TEXT.

    This message can be stopped by set FileTypeConfirmFlg to NIL.

    Either of these messages can be stopped by setting IL:FileTypeConfirmFlg to NIL.


    IL:DEFAULTFILETYPE [Variable]

    image

    Initially set to TEXT. Used with the file attribute TYPE.


    DEFAULTFILETYPELIST [Variable]

    image

    A list of accepted file types. Initially set to ((NIL . TEXT)(C . TEXT)(H . TEXT) (LISP . TEXT)(LSP . TEXT)(O . BINARY)(OUT . BINARY)(LCOM . BINARY) (DFASL . BINARY)(DCOM . BINARY)(SKETCH . BINARY)

    (TEDIT . BINARY)(DISPLAYFONT . BINARY)(WD . BINARY)(IP . BINARY) (RST . BINARY)(BIN . BINARY)(MAIL . BINARY)(SYSOUT . BINARY))

    Used with the file attribute TYPE. Binary files, such as Sketch files, InterPress files, or Press files, should have their extensions registered in DEFAULTFILETYPELIST. This is especially important because UNIX does not support file types.

    image


    File System Errors

    image

    Several types of errors may occur in the Medley file system.

    When a remotely mounted file system or NFS service is down, or when network traffic is heavy, any attempt to access a file on that file system results in an error. The following error message is printed in the prompt window:

    File access timed out

    Medley will wait until the file system responds or until a timeout occurs. If the file system is mounted with the "hard" option, the timeout is controlled by the value of

    environment variable LDEFILETIMEOUT. If the file system is mounted with the "soft"

    option, the timeout depends on the NFS file system timeout time, and the value of

    LDEFILETIMEOUT. Medley will wait until the shorter of these two times is exceeded.

    The NFS file system timeout time, retry times, etc., are controlled by the UNIX command mount.

    If LDEFILETIMEOUT is not set, the default value of 10 seconds is used. The variable is inspected at boot time, and a setting between 1 and 100 seconds is appropriate in most cases.

    The following error messages may appear when there are Medley file errors:

    Not owner Device error:

    Protection-violation File-won’t-open

    Too-Many-Files-Open File too large

    File-System-Resources-Exceeded Connectiom timed out

    No-Such-Directory Bad Host Name

    FS-RENAMEFILE-SOURCE-COULDNT-DELETE

    Another type of error occurs when the user has insufficient access to files. When this happens, Medley will print the following message:

    File not found

    The following message then appears in the SunOS prompt window:

    System call error: open errno=13 Permission denied

    See the UNIX Interface Reference Manual , Intro (2), for descriptions of all OS system call messages.



    [This page intentionally left blank]

  2. ERROR RECOVERY

    image


    Medley on the Sun Workstation has an error handling system which includes the following:

  1. ERROR RECOVERY


image


If you want to use the executable that Venue supplies, skip to the Enabling PUP/XNS Ethernet subsection below.


Relinking

If you have tried the prelinked software and it doesn’t work, link the object code with the Sun libraries. To do this, you need the suntool, sunwindow, and pixrect

libraries, and make, cc, etc., available on your search path. To configure the system,

connect (cd) to the directory usr/share/lde/install.sunosx (where x is the version of SunOS that you are running, e.g., SunOS 4.0 in the following), and type make .

prompt% cd /usr/share/lde/install.sunos4

prompt% rm lde ldeether; make

This procedure replaces the two executable programs , lde and ldeether. The program

ldeether enables access to Xerox network protocols from Lisp.


Enabling PUP/XNS Ethernet

If you intend to use the PUP or XNS Ethernet directly from Medley, you need to change file ownership and permissions of ldeether. Note that you do this on the server where ldeether is actually residing (root permission must be on the server). Log in to the

machine where ldeether resides. To find out where ldeether resides, type:

prompt% df filename

where filename is the pathname of ldeether. The system responds with the name of a file system (e.g., /dev/sd0g) for a local file, or with a machine name and directory (e.g., python:/user1) for an NFS file.

Now you can change the ldeether file ownership and permissions.

prompt% rlogin server

server% su

server# cd /usr/share/lde/install.sunos4

server# /etc/chown root ldeether server# chmod 4755 ldeether server# exit

If you are using the Ethernet, substitute ldeether whenever lde appears in the instructions below.


Using NIS to Manage the Keys for Multiple Workstations

Here is an example how to handle several Medley licenses on a network, by using the Sun Network Information Service (NIS).

Create a file containing an association list of hostnames vs. license keys, for each host that has a Medley license. For example:


# medley-keys.by-hostname

# ========================================

king 6a1c33bf 11dc1a48 a4c34080 sidewinder 7b636e98 55a26cd4 26b80560 hognose 190750c0 17c658e0 08060ac0

boa 8334d182 00793e07 4903890b

asp c90faa4f d3477c53 d304b85b

rattler 70b8fd18 2d79f344 c30051c0


NOTE that the following commands should all be run as root.

On your NIS master server, create an NIS database of hostname vs. Medley keys:

prompt% /usr/etc/yp/makedbm ./medley-keys.by-hostname \

/var/yp/your-domain/medley-keys

Replace your-domain with the name of your NIS domain. The output is put in the directory containing your master NIS maps.

If you have NIS slave servers serving your domain, you will need to update each one manually the first time the map is created. Thereafter, they will be updated

automatically. On each NIS slave server do the following:

% /usr/etc/yp/ypxfr -f -h your-NIS-master medley-keys

Replace your-NIS-master with the name your NIS master server.

After updating all NIS slave servers, you now need to propagate the NIS map to your NIS clients. On your NIS master, type:

% /usr/etc/yp/yppush medley-keys

From now on, any changes made to the medley-keys.by-hostname file will only require the propagation of the map to your NIS clients. The following steps are

required:

  1. Create a new NIS map using the makedbm command as described above.

  2. Propagate the changes to your NIS clients using the yppush command as described above.

You can now use the newly created map. Below is an example of a runlde script that uses the newly created NIS map.

#! /bin/csh -f

# ========================================

# Usage : runlde [sysout] #

# Script for running Venue Medley software. #

# ========================================

if ($#argv > 1) then

echo "Usage : runlde [sysout]" endif


set SYSOUT = "$1"

set HOSTNAME = ‘/bin/hostname‘

set KEY = ‘/bin/ypmatch $HOSTNAME medley-keys‘

image


if ! $status then

ldeether $SYSOUT -k "$KEY" endif

Consult the Sun Network and Communications Administration manual for more details about NIS and how to add the new map to the /var/yp/Makefile.



[This page intentionally left blank]

APPENDIX B. VERIFYING THE INSTALLATION

TAPE’S VALIDITY

image


If you encounter inexplicable problems shortly after you install Medley, they may be due to files being corrupted — the release tape may have been damaged, errors may

have occurred while the tape was being read, etc. If you have unexplained problems, we recommend that you verify the checksums of your installed files.

The script generates checksum files named *.check and compares them to the released

*.sum residing in the /checksumdir subdirectory.

The checksum script reports inconsistent files, the correct checksum values for the files, and an error message. The checksum of individual files can be generated with the UNIX command sum filename.


ldechecksum [-cg] medleydir [ dir | dirgroup ] [Command]

image

-c Generates checksums for your installed files and compares them with correct values. This is the default action.

-g Generates checksums for the files specified.

medleydir Name of the Medley installation directory. Default is /usr/share/lde.

dir Any specific directory residing under medleydir. Only relative pathnames with respect to medleydir are accepted.


dirgroup The directory group, either all (the default) or lisp , which includes the

X/install.xxxx, X/lisplibrary and X/lispsysouts directories.


Output

As it begins checking each directory, the script prints a message in the form:

Checking directory: /usr/share/lde/subdir


Error and warning messages may be in one of two form s:

< E > 32711 49 4045XLPSTREAM.DFASL

indicates that file 4045XLPSTREAM.DFASL is erroneous or does not exist in the

directory. The correct checksum of 32711, together with the size (49 Kbytes) of the file, are shown.

< W > /usr/share/lde/fonts/display/chinese : Directory not installed

indicates that Chinese font s were not installed or were removed after Medley was installed.


Examples

prompt% ldechecksum /usr/share/lde


All files in the installed Medley directories in /usr/share/lde are checked.


prompt% ldechecksum /usr/share/somedir/lde lisp


This example checks all files in:

/usr/share/somedir/lde/install.xxxx

/usr/share/somedir/lde/lisplibrary

/usr/share/somedir/lde/lispsysouts


prompt% cd/usr/share/lde


prompt% ldechecksum -c . fonts/display


This example checks only the display font directories. The period ( .) is used because you are positioned under the current Medley installation directory.



[This page intentionally left blank]

APPENDIX C. LAYOUT OF INSTALLATION TAPE FILES

image


Layout of Installation Tape

image

Below follows the layout of the Medley Installation Tape with a description of the individual files.


FILE 1

FILE 2


FILE 6


File Contents Description

  1. ./install-medley The Medley installation utility


    image

  2. ./medley The Medley startup script


    image

  3. ./install.sunos3/ (only on the Sun3 installation tape)

    ./install.sunos4/

    ./install.sunos4.1/

    Each subdirectory contains:

    lde Used as a bootstrapper to load the right emulator, depending on the frame-buffer of your host and

    whether X Windows is running.

    ldeether Used when you want to use the XNS protocol from

    within Medley on a Sun. It will set up your system to intercept XNS and PUP packets and then

    immediately runs lde.

    ldesingle The emulator used to run Medley on a workstation

    with a monochrome display or one with a color frame- buffer of type cg2, cg4, or cg9.

    ldemulti The emulator used to run Medley on a workstation with a color frame-buffer of type cg3 or cg6.

    ldex The emulator used to run Medley on a workstation where an X Windows server is running.

    ldesingle.o ldemulti.o

    ldex.o These object files are used when recompiling the

    emulators to either include your own C subroutines or when problems arise.

    makefile

    usersubrs.c Used when you wish to link your own C subroutines into the emulator (a non-documented feature).

    ldeether.c The source code for the ldeether. Its only purpose is to allow you to recompile the ethernet set-up code

    should you run into any problems.


    image


  4. ./lisplibrary Contains all the Medley 2.0 Lisp Library files


    image

  5. ./checksumdir Contains ldechecksum, checksum and X.sum checksum

    files (See Appendix B for a detailed explanation)


    ./lispsysouts Contains the sysout, lisp.sysout


    image

  6. ./fonts/display Contains the display font s (See Table C-1 for a detailed

description of the individual font files)


./fonts/interpress Contains the Interpress printer font s (See Table C-1 for a

detailed description of the individual font files)

image


Font Directories

image

Table C-1 shows the organization of the font directories, as well as the descriptions and contents of the directories.

Table C-1. Font Directories


Directory Name Description Font Families Font Types

./fonts/display/presentation All presentation font s Helvetica Sans serif

./fonts/interpress/presentation for display and user Gacha Monospace screen font in

interface applications 8, 10, 12 MRR Times Roman Serif


./fonts/display/publishing All publishing font s for Classic Serif; in all character sets,

./fonts/interpress/publishing character sets, foreign sizes, faces

characters, and techni- Modern sans serif; in all character cal alphabets sets, faces, but with

selected sizes

Terminal Monospaced, in all character sets, faces,

but with selected sizes


./fonts/display/printwheel All printwheel font s Bold PS Proportional serif

./fonts/interpress/printwheel for word processing LetterGothic Monospaced sans serif

applications Titan Monospaced serif


./fonts/display/JIS1 J apanese Kanji font s, Classic Point sizes 8 through 24

./fonts/interpress/JIS1 character set 1


./fonts/display/JIS2 J apanese Kanji font s, Classic Point sizes 8 through 24

./fonts/interpress/JIS2 character set 2


./fonts/display/chinese Chinese character Classic Point sizes 12 and 24

./fonts/interpress/chinese font s Modern 12 point


./fonts/display/miscellaneous Miscellaneous font s ClassicThin Brackets and parentheses in

./fonts/interpress/miscellaneous for nonstandard and point sizes 16, 20, 26, and 30

rare applications Hippo Greek or Latin

Logo Xerox logo

Math Math symbols

OldEnglish Point sizes 10 and 18 Symbol Math symbols

Tonto Thick monospaced 14 point MRR

./fonts/press All metric information for Press printers.


Manually Extracting Files from the Installation Tape

You can manually extract individual files or directories from the Medley installation tape. For example, if you want to extract the X-win dow emulator ldex for SunOS release 4.1 from the tape do the following:

prompt% mt -f /dev/nrst0 rewind


Ensures that the tape is positioned at the beginning of the tape.

prompt% mt -f /dev/nrst0 fsf 2


Positions the tape at the beginning of the third file on the tape. The n in the

/dev/nrst0 makes sure the tape is not rewound after the command has been completed.

prompt% tar xvf /dev/nrst0 ./install.sunos4.1/ldex


Extracts ldex from the Medley installation tape and puts it in your current working directory.

APPENDIX D. DIFFERENCES BETWEEN XEROX

WORKSTATIONS AND THE UNIX VERSION OF MEDLEY

image


Local Disk and Floppy Functions

The functions for controlling device-specific behavior of the Xerox 1100 series workstation disk drives are not supported. These functions signal the error

Wrong machinetype

if called when running under UNIX. These functions include IL:PURGEDSKDIRECTORY IL:CREATEDSKDIRECTORY

IL:VOLUMESIZE IL:DISKFREEPAGES IL:DISKPARTITION IL:SCAVENGEDSKDIRECTORY IL:FILENAMEFROMID

The following functions for controlling the Xerox 1100 series workstation floppy disk drive also signal an error under UNIX:

IL:FLOPPY.FORMAT, IL:FLOPPY.NAME, IL:FLOPPY.TO.FILE, IL:FLOPPY.FROM.FILE, IL:FLOPPY.ARCHIVE, IL:FLOPPY.UNARCHIVE, IL:FLOPPY.MODE, IL:FLOPPY.FREE.PAGES, IL:FLOPPY.CAN.READP, IL:FLOPPY.CAN.WRITEP, IL:FLOPPY.WAIT.FOR.FLOPPY, IL:FLOPPY.SCAVENGE

These functions signal the error

Floppy: No floppy drive on this machine. Device error:

{FLOPPY}

The following functions have no effect and always return NIL on UNIX:

IL:VOLUMES IL:LISPDIRECTORYP IL:DSKDISPLAY


Library Modules Not Supported on the Sun

The following modules listed in the manual Lisp Library Modules, Medley Release , are not supported on the Sun Workstation running Medley.


TCP, TCPCHAT, etc.

Because SunOS supports TCP/IP directly, TCP packets cannot be routed to Medley. For this reason, the TCP library modules are not supported on the Sun Workstation.


DLRS232C, DLTTY

The DLRS232C and DLTTY library modules are specific to the hardware devices

available on the Xerox 1100 series workstations. Serial lines and other devices can be accessed from Medley either through sub-shells, or by using the {UNIX} file device, e.g., writing to {UNIX}/dev/ttya or {UNIX}/dev/ttyb.

The following library modules are normally used with equipment attached to the Xerox 1186 RS232 serial lines:

FX-80DRIVER

4045XLPSTREAM KERMIT

RS232CHAT.


KEYBOARDEDITOR, VIRTUALKEYBOARD

Medley does not include versions of KEYBOARDEDITOR or VIRTUALKEYBOARD library modules that know about the Sun keyboards.

VIRTUALKEYBOARD lets you bring up keyboard images that give you access to special characters via the mouse. The keyboard itself is unaffected.

image



[This page intentionally left blank]

GLOSSARY

image


access permissions* Determines what operations can be performed on a file.

alias* A user-created C-Shell command defined in terms of other commands or programs. For example, if you type (or put in your .cshrc file)

alias runlde "lde ~/sysout -k xx"

then when you type runlde to the C-Shell, it acts as if you had typed

lde ~/sysout -k xx

backing store A Xerox 1100 series workstation file, the virtual memory partition. This file stores pages as they are allocated or flushed from real memory.

byte code emulator A byte-code instruction interpreter. Executes the Interlisp-

D virtual machine instruction set compatibly with microcode for the Xerox workstations.

chmod * A program used to change access permissions of a file.

cho w n * A program used to change ownership of a file.

{DSK} A host device name allowing users to access the SunOS file system. Uses conventions (e.g., version numbers and file

name recognition which ignores the case of letters) similar to those used by the Xerox 1100 series workstation local disk device ({DSK}).

environment variable* A name/value pair that is passed to subprocesses. Can be

set from the shell with the setenv command. By

convention, environment variable names use uppercase

rather than lowercase letters, e.g., LDEDESTSYSOUT. The Medley environment variables are LDESRCESYSOUT, LDEDESTSYSOUT, LDEINIT, LDESHELL.

home directory * The working directory when a user logs in.

host access key A special code which must be entered to Medley to run Medley software on the Sun Workstation.

lde Lisp development environment.

ldeether A program produced during the software startup

procedure; runs lde after enabling access to Xerox network protocol.

.login* The name of a file in the home directory that is read by the shell when a user first logs in. Contains C-Shell

commands.

Medley The Venue programming environment; also, the name of the release. Supports Common Lisp and Interlisp; a

library of utilities, graphics packages, applications; a

complete windowing system; network protocols. Runs on both Xerox and Sun workstations.


NFS* Network File System; the way SunOS handles remote file systems.

image


pathnames* In UNIX, a position identifier of a file or directory within the file system tree structure.

An absolute pathname gives the position, beginning with

the root directory, of the file or directory in the file system hierarchy. Each directory in the pathname is delimited by

a slash (/).

A relative pathname locates the position of the desired file or directory from the working directory. Again, all

directories in this pathname are delimited by the slash (/).

root directory* The root of the directory tree. Designated by a slash (/) at the beginning of an absolute pathname. Slashes elsewhere in a pathname are simply delimiters.

shell* Command interpreter (akin to the Medley Exec).

shell script* A file that contains shell commands. Can be run by typing the file name provided the user has execute permission on the file.

site initialization file A Lisp file, used when Medley is started up. Contains

standardized information about the site environment such as pointers to font s and site parameters.

SunOS Sun’s version of UNIX.

suntools A Sun system window–based program tool. A program

that allows all of the Sun window–based tools to run on the screen.

tar A program for copying data to and from magnetic tape .

{UNIX} A host device name allowing users to access the SunOS file system using UNIX naming conventions. Files on the

{UNIX} device have no version numbers and file name

recognition distinguishes between upper– and lowercase letters.

* Indicates a UNIX term. See UNIX documentation for full definition.



[This page intentionally left blank]

INDEX

image


A

Access key 11,13 Asterisk 36

AUTHOR (File Attribute) 38


B

Back trace 40,42

BACKGROUNDPAGEFREQ (Variable) 25

BEEPOFF (Function) 27

BEEPON (Function) 27

\ BeginDST (Variable) 12,22

Binary files 4,38,40

Binary image, executable A-2; 13 Brackets

left angle 33

right angle 31 square 31


C

C-Shell 32

Carriage return 4,38,40

Case sensitivity 33,35,39,40,41,42

CHANGEBACKGROUNDBORDER (Function) 27

Characters, special 32

CHDIR (Function) 35,37,44,45

checksum 1,3, B-1

chmod (UNIX Command) 38

creation 36,37

deletion 37

enumeration 36 home 32,37

name delimiting 31 parent 32

DISKFREEPAGES (Function) D-1

DISKPARTITION (Function) D-1

Display functions 27

Display font s, how to find 12,21 DISPLAYFONTDIRECTORIES (Variable) 12,21 DLRS232C D-2

DLTTY D-2

{DSK} 26,32,36, 38

special characters 32

naming conventions 33

{DSK}INIT. 12, 16

DSKDISPLAY (Function) D-1


E

Emulator 2

\ EndDST (Variable) 13,22

End-of-line convention 4,38,40 Environment variable A-1

LDEDESTSYSOUT 23 LDEINIT 11,16

LDESOURCESYSOUT 14,15

CLOCK (Function) 28 Clocks 27

obtaining value of 26

EOL (File Attribute) 38

CNDIR (Function) 37

Compatibility

compiled-file 4

end-of-line convention 4 sysout 4

Configuration

changing 11

software A-2 CONN (Command) 37 Console messages 28 Conventions

common {DSK} and {UNIX} 32

{DSK} naming 33 font s 3

Medley devices 3,17,35

notation 3

URAID 39,41

Copy protection 11

CREATIONDATE (File Attribute) 38

.cshrc file 13, A-1


D

Daylight Savings Time

setting values for 12,22

DEFAULTFILETYPE (Variable) 38,39

DEFAULTFILETYPELIST (Variable) 38,39

DEFAULTPRINTERTYPE (Variable) 12,21

DEFAULTPRINTINGHOST (Variable) 12,21

DIRECTORIES (Variable) 12,21

Directory

changing 32,37

Errors

fatal 44

file system 39,41 Lisp 44


F

fg (UNIX Command) 25 File attributes 38

File name

conventions 31 recognition 32

File protection bits, changing 38 file resources, exceeding 44

File streams 32

File system errors 39 File types 39

File variables 39

FILENAMEFROMID (Function) D-1

Files

binary 4,38,40

finding 12,21 open 37, 44

text 38

transfer 38

versionless 34

FINDFILE (Function) 35 FLOPPY.ARCHIVE (Function) D-1 FLOPPY.CAN.READP (Function) D-1 FLOPPY.CAN.WRITEP (Function) D-1 FLOPPY.FORMAT (Function) D-1 FLOPPY.FREE.PAGES (Function) D-1 FLOPPY.FROM.FILE (Function) D-1


FLOPPY.MODE (Function) D-1 FLOPPY.NAME (Function) D-1 FLOPPY.SCAVENGE (Function) D-1 FLOPPY.TO.FILE (Function) D-1 FLOPPY.UNARCHIVE (Function) D-1 FLOPPY.WAIT.FOR.FLOPPY (Function) D-1

Font directories C-3 Fonts 2

font conventions 3 Interpress 12,21

Frames, viewing 41,43 Functions

display and keyboard 27 environment inquiry 26 Lisp-stopping 25

login 26

system environment 24 timer and clock 27

VM 25


G

GETFILEINFO (Function) 38


H

Hardware, requirements 1,24 Host access key 13

Host ID 11

identifying 24

Host name, identifying 24 Hosts supported by Medley

{CORE} 31

{DSK} 31

{LPT} 31

{NULL} 31

{UNIX} 31


I

Input/output devices, requirements 1

install.sunosX 1 Installation

preparation 7 script 9

software 9

tape layout C-1

extracting files from C-4 Installation Options Menu 9

Interlisp package 39,41 InterPress files 39

InterPress font s, finding 12,21

INTERPRESSFONTDIRECTORIES (Variable) 12,21


K

Kermit 38

KEYACTION (Function) 15,17

Keyboard functions 27 Keyboard template

Sun 3 15,18

Sun 4 15,18

Keyboard tone generator 27

KEYBOARDEDITOR D-2

KEYDOWNP (Function) 15,17

kill (UNIX Command) 42,44

L

lde 13,22, A-3

killing 42,44 ldechecksum (Command) 1, B-1 LDEDESTSYSOUT (Variable) 23

ldeether 13, A-3

LDEFILETIMEOUT (Variable) 40

LDEINIT (Variable ) 11,16

LDEKBDTYPE (Variable) 16,19

LDEKBDTYPE (Variable) 17

LDESRCESYSOUT (Variable) 14,15

Left angle bracket 33,35

Library files, finding 12,21 Line feed 4,38,40

Lisp symbols

set in site initialization file 12,21

LISP-RELEASE-VERSION (Variable) 24

LispUsers’ Modules 5 finding 12,21

LISPUSERSDIRECTORIES (Variable) 12,21

litatom 39,41 LOGIN (Function) 26 Login functions 26

LOGOUT (Function) 22,23

*LONG-SITE-NAME* (Variable) 12, 22

LONG-SITE-NAME (Function) 12,22


M

MACHINE-INSTANCE (Function) 24 MACHINE-TYPE (Function) 24 MACHINE-VERSION (Function) 24

MACHINETYPE (Function) 24 Medley, exiting 23

Memory, requirements 1 MP errors 39,41

\ MY.NSADDRESS (Variable) 24


N

Naming onventions 32, 33

Network address, identifying 24 NFS service 40


O

Object file A-2

OPENFILE (Function) 38

OPENSTREAM (Function) 38

Operating system requirements 2 Options, adding 11


P

Packages 3

Passwords, maintaining for access 26 Pathname, Lisp 31,35

Period

single 32,37

double 32,37

Personal init file, set up 22 PLAYTUNE (Function) 27 Postscript 1

Postscriptstream Module 5

image


Press files 39

Printers 1

default 12,21 PROTECTION (File Attribute) 38 Protocol

Ethernet 2 PUP 13

pstat (UNIX Command) 8

PUP protocol 13, 38 installation 3,8

PURGEDSKDIRECTORY (Function) D-1


R

\ RCLKMILLISECOND (Variable) 28

READSYS 42,44

REALMEMORYSIZE (Function) 24

Relative pathnames 33 Release contents 4, 5

Relinking A-3

Right angle bracket 31 RINGBELLS (Function) 27 rmdir (UNIX Command) 37 root (UNIX Command) 13 RPC 5


S

SAVEVM (Function) 22,23 setenv (UNIX Command) 23 SETMAINTPANEL (Function) 27

SETPASSWORD (Function) 26

SETTIME (Function) 28

setuid (UNIX Command) 26

SETUSERNAME (Function) 26

*SHORT-SITE-NAME* (Variable) 12, 22

SHORT-SITE-NAME (Function) 12,22

Site initialization file 11,15 how to find 12,21

site-init.lisp 11,16 SIZE (File Attribute) 38 Sketch files 39

Slash 31

Software requirements 2, A-2 Special characters 32

Square brackets 31 Stack 40,42

Sun type 3 keyboard 17,18 Sun type 4 keyboard 17, 19

Sun Workstations, sharing 2 SunOS

versions supported 2,37,38,39

Type 4 keyboard 16,19 console messages 28 directory notations 32 file system 31

username 26 SunOS process

identifying username of 26

SUSPEND-LISP (Function) 25

Swap space, allocating additional 8 Symbols

set in site initialization file 12,21 Sysout 2,13,39,41

files 37, 39

locations of 13,15

SYSOUT (Function) 24,45 System administrator 9,13


T

TCP D-1

TCPCHAT D-1 TCP/IP 38


Teleraid 39,41

Template

Sun 3 keyboard 15,18

Sun 4 keyboard 15,18

Text files 4,38,40 tilde 32

tilde-slash 35,37 TIME (Function) 28 Timers 27

/tmp/XXXX-lisp.log 29

TYPE (File Attribute) 38,39

U

{UNIX} 26,36,37,38

naming conventions 35

{UNIX} (Function) 32

UNIX process, suspending 25

UNIX-FULLNAME (Function) 26

UNIX-GETENV (Function) 26 UNIX-GETPARM (Function) 26 UNIX-USERNAME (Function) 26 URAID 39,41

commands 40,42

quit 40,42

/usr/share/lde 1, 2, B-1

User IDs, maintaining for access 26

USERGREETFILES (Variable) 12,21

USERNAME (Function) 26


V

Version

identifying machine 24 numbering 33

numbers 32,35 VIDEOCOLOR (Function) 27 VIDEORATE (Function) 27 VIRTUALKEYBOARD D-2

Virtual memory

saving 23,24,25

saving with URAID 42,44 VM functions 25 VMEM.PURE.STATE (Variable) 25

VMEMSIZE (Function) 23,25 VOLUMES (Function) D-1 VOLUMESIZE (Function) D-1 VRAID 42,44


W

WRITEDATE (File Attribute) 38


X

X Windows 16

Medley window 17

preparing to run Medley 13,16 running Medley remotely 16

starting 17

XNS Ethernet protocol 2, 8,13 enabling A-3

\

\ BeginDST (Variable) 12,22

\ EndDST (Variable) 13,22

\ MY.NSADDRESS (Variable) 24

\ RCLKMILLISECOND (Variable) 28


{

{CORE} 31

{DSK} 26,32,36,38

special characters 32

naming conventions 33

{DSK}INIT. 12,16

{LPT} 31

{NULL} 31

{UNIX} 26,36,37,38

naming conventions 35

{UNIX} (Function) 32

~

~ 32

~/ 35,37

~/lisp.virtualmem 14,15,22,23

*

* 36

*LONG-SITE-NAME* (Variable) 12,22

*SHORT-SITE-NAME* (Variable) 12,22

.

. 32,37

.. 32,37

.cshrc file A-1; 13

.login file 13

/

/ 31

/install.sunosx A-3

/usr/share/lde 1, 2, B-1


<

< 33,35


>


[

[] 31